The intervention ‘Enhancing Peer Interactions and Social Capital’ (EPISC) develops a participatory approach to supporting safe, positive peer interactions and social relationships in multi-ethnic schools. Through clustering pupils with migrant and non-migrant background in small collaborative groups working together on establishing social connection and participatory activities in the school context, the intervention aims at strengthening school belonging and promoting dialogue between minority and majority groups.

Enhancing Peer Interactions and Social Capital (responsible expert: University of Sussex, UK)

 

The intervention builds on research undertaken by Watters and colleagues (2009) in schools in the UK that observed an integrationist attitude as positively associated with two psychosocial outcomes: self-esteem and peer acceptance. The findings provided strong support for Berry’s (1997) prediction that an acculturation attitude that combines both culture maintenance and intergroup contact will have the most favourable prognosis for well-being.

 

However, the research found that an integrationist outlook at one time point predicted a greater number of negative emotional symptoms suggesting that endorsing integration was something of a two-edged sword: it increased self-esteem and acceptance by peers, but also led to manifesting more negative emotional symptoms. The research indicated that the quest to be integrated, involving engagement alongside cultural maintenance may have consequences in terms of discriminatory behaviours.

 

In a study of educational achievement in Belgian secondary schools, it was found that an integrationist orientation was linked to academic success only for students who experienced relatively low levels of discrimination; for those reporting higher levels of discrimination, academic achievement was noticeably lower (Baysu, Phalet & Brown, 2011).

 

A helpful orientation towards examining intergroup interactions in this context is to focus on the generation of social capital, specifically the ways in which both bonding and bridging social capital is developed in schools. Previous research has demonstrated the close relationship between bridging social capital and an integrationist approach (Watters et al., 2009). This intervention provides an opportunity to examine strategies aimed at developing positive peer interactions and social support in the context of multi-ethnic schools.

 

It will be based initially in a school that has introduced refugee children in recent years and has been active in trying to support an integrative approach. The school will offer specific initiatives aimed towards enhancing students integration including classes aimed at appreciating cultural diversity and focussed on the `World on the Move’ that aims to enhance understanding of migratory processes.

  • In-service teacher training

    The aim of the INSETT intervention is to enhance teachers’ insight into how refugee /migration experiences may impact young people’s psychosocial well-being and school functioning upon resettlement in a new country (Brenner & Kia-Keating, 2016; Pastoor, 2015, 2017).

    See how it works
    In-service teacher training
  • Welcome To School

    This intervention builds on the Welcome to School initiative developed by the Pharos Refugees and Health Knowledge Centre (the Netherlands), with support from the European Refugee Fund. Rooted in the theoretical principles of social capital, the Welcome to School Initiative seeks to strengthen the competencies of refugee and migrant youth with regards to self-esteem, coping, social skills and behavioral adjustment.

    See how it works
    Welcome To School
  • Classroom Drama intervention

    In a nine-week drama workshop intervention program, refugee and migrant adolescents in multi-ethnic schools work around the construction of group stories that support the construction of identity and meaning, aiming to establish bridges between past and present and to engage with themes of migration, exclusion, pluriform identities and cultural adaptation in host societies.

    See how it works
    Classroom Drama intervention
  • Teaching Recovery Techniques + In-service Teacher Training

    Teaching Recovery Techniques is a manualized intervention developed by the Children and War foundation (Yule, Dyregrov, Raundalen, & Smith, 2013). TRT is based on trauma focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) and includes seven sessions for young people and two for the caregivers. For children, session one is about getting to know each other and session seven a follow-up.

    See how it works
    Teaching Recovery Techniques + In-service Teacher Training
  • PIER intervention

    The intervention ‘Enhancing Peer Interactions and Social Capital’ (EPISC) develops a participatory approach to supporting safe, positive peer interactions and social relationships in multi-ethnic schools. Through clustering pupils with migrant and non-migrant background in small collaborative groups working together on establishing social connection and participatory activities in the school context, the intervention aims at strengthening school belonging and promoting dialogue between minority and majority groups.

    See how it works
    PIER intervention

Teaching Recovery Techniques is a manualized intervention developed by the Children and War foundation (Yule, Dyregrov, Raundalen, & Smith, 2013). TRT is based on trauma focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) and includes seven sessions for young people and two for the caregivers. For children, session one is about getting to know each other and session seven a follow-up.

Teaching Recovery Techniques (responsible expert: University of Tampere, Finland)

 

Each session lasts between 90 to 120 min and includes skills training, rehearsal and homework. Two group leaders who receives training in TRT deliver the sessions.

 

The second and third session focuses on intrusion. The group discuss war-related news and discuss common reactions to trauma and to practice visualizing “safe place”. The second session is about normalizing common experiences in war. Then, in the third session, the group discusses intrusively thoughts and learn about imaginary techniques.

 

The fourth session is about arousal. The group practices relaxation techniques and coping self-statement.

 

The fifth and sixth sessions are about exposure, and traumatic reminders are discussed. In session five, the group practices how to plan a real-life grades exposure. In session six, the group learn how they can expose themselves to trauma memories by talking, writing and drawing and use the coping strategies they learn in the previous sessions. The group also discusses the importance of doing enjoyable things.

 

The last session is a follow-up session and aims to discuss in a more relaxed way without discussing further the content of the intervention. The two sessions for the caregivers are held without children. The first session for the caregivers is held before the session for the children starts, and the second session is held between the second and fourth session for the children.

 

In 2017, Chap group at Uppsala University conducted an exploratory trial on TRT including 10 groups (N=55) of 13-18-year-old, mainly male, unaccompanied refugee minors (URM). Pre- and post-measures were available for 46 participants (84%). Although more than half (62%) of the participants reported negative life events during the study, both PTSD and depression symptoms decreased significantly after the intervention; 22% recovered from their PTSD symptoms, while 33% recovered from depressive symptoms (Sarkadi et al., 2017).

 

Overall, our results indicated that TRT, a light-touch intervention delivered in the community, is a promising indicated preventive program for URM with PTSD symptoms. Tampere University have several years’ of experience with TRT in Palestine and have published a number of studies on its efficacy (e.g., Qouta, et al., 2012).

  • In-service teacher training

    The aim of the INSETT intervention is to enhance teachers’ insight into how refugee /migration experiences may impact young people’s psychosocial well-being and school functioning upon resettlement in a new country (Brenner & Kia-Keating, 2016; Pastoor, 2015, 2017).

    See how it works
    In-service teacher training
  • Welcome To School

    This intervention builds on the Welcome to School initiative developed by the Pharos Refugees and Health Knowledge Centre (the Netherlands), with support from the European Refugee Fund. Rooted in the theoretical principles of social capital, the Welcome to School Initiative seeks to strengthen the competencies of refugee and migrant youth with regards to self-esteem, coping, social skills and behavioral adjustment.

    See how it works
    Welcome To School
  • Classroom Drama intervention

    In a nine-week drama workshop intervention program, refugee and migrant adolescents in multi-ethnic schools work around the construction of group stories that support the construction of identity and meaning, aiming to establish bridges between past and present and to engage with themes of migration, exclusion, pluriform identities and cultural adaptation in host societies.

    See how it works
    Classroom Drama intervention
  • Teaching Recovery Techniques + In-service Teacher Training

    Teaching Recovery Techniques is a manualized intervention developed by the Children and War foundation (Yule, Dyregrov, Raundalen, & Smith, 2013). TRT is based on trauma focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) and includes seven sessions for young people and two for the caregivers. For children, session one is about getting to know each other and session seven a follow-up.

    See how it works
    Teaching Recovery Techniques + In-service Teacher Training
  • PIER intervention

    The intervention ‘Enhancing Peer Interactions and Social Capital’ (EPISC) develops a participatory approach to supporting safe, positive peer interactions and social relationships in multi-ethnic schools. Through clustering pupils with migrant and non-migrant background in small collaborative groups working together on establishing social connection and participatory activities in the school context, the intervention aims at strengthening school belonging and promoting dialogue between minority and majority groups.

    See how it works
    PIER intervention

In a nine-week drama workshop intervention program, refugee and migrant adolescents in multi-ethnic schools work around the construction of group stories that support the construction of identity and meaning, aiming to establish bridges between past and present and to engage with themes of migration, exclusion, pluriform identities and cultural adaptation in host societies.

Lead partner: Belgium

Classroom Drama Therapy Program (responsible expert: KULeuven, Belgium)

 

The intervention is based on Boal’s forum and Fox’ playback theater (Fox, 2000), and was developed at McGill Transcultural Psychiatry and Concordia University Creative Arts.

 

Playback theatre consists of a specific modality of improvisational practice aiming at personal and social transformation through sharing lived experiences within a ritual space. Revolving around a commitment to social justice, playback theatre provides possibilities to address migration-related themes (e.g., exile, exclusion, inequality), revolving around the actively re-shaping of social structures in theatre practice and enabling dynamic relational positions to emerge within a participant group.

 

The program consists of a nine-week sequence of 75-minute sessions, set up with the regular class group. Coordinated by a play director, a team trained actors and musicians (with experience in applied theatre in vulnerable communities) develop a theatrical representation of stories shared by participant-adolescents. In response to this replay, students participate in a joint reconstruction of the story, enabling the dynamic shifting of meanings and the empowering experience of modifying situations and moving from positions of passivity to agency and co-construction.

 

Throughout the 10-week program, student involvement and topic complexity gradually increase. Studies have indicated that participation in the drama workshop intervention program was associated with a decrease in psychosocial impairment in first-generation migrant and refugee adolescents (Rousseau et al., 2007, 2014).

  • In-service teacher training

    The aim of the INSETT intervention is to enhance teachers’ insight into how refugee /migration experiences may impact young people’s psychosocial well-being and school functioning upon resettlement in a new country (Brenner & Kia-Keating, 2016; Pastoor, 2015, 2017).

    See how it works
    In-service teacher training
  • Welcome To School

    This intervention builds on the Welcome to School initiative developed by the Pharos Refugees and Health Knowledge Centre (the Netherlands), with support from the European Refugee Fund. Rooted in the theoretical principles of social capital, the Welcome to School Initiative seeks to strengthen the competencies of refugee and migrant youth with regards to self-esteem, coping, social skills and behavioral adjustment.

    See how it works
    Welcome To School
  • Classroom Drama intervention

    In a nine-week drama workshop intervention program, refugee and migrant adolescents in multi-ethnic schools work around the construction of group stories that support the construction of identity and meaning, aiming to establish bridges between past and present and to engage with themes of migration, exclusion, pluriform identities and cultural adaptation in host societies.

    See how it works
    Classroom Drama intervention
  • Teaching Recovery Techniques + In-service Teacher Training

    Teaching Recovery Techniques is a manualized intervention developed by the Children and War foundation (Yule, Dyregrov, Raundalen, & Smith, 2013). TRT is based on trauma focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) and includes seven sessions for young people and two for the caregivers. For children, session one is about getting to know each other and session seven a follow-up.

    See how it works
    Teaching Recovery Techniques + In-service Teacher Training
  • PIER intervention

    The intervention ‘Enhancing Peer Interactions and Social Capital’ (EPISC) develops a participatory approach to supporting safe, positive peer interactions and social relationships in multi-ethnic schools. Through clustering pupils with migrant and non-migrant background in small collaborative groups working together on establishing social connection and participatory activities in the school context, the intervention aims at strengthening school belonging and promoting dialogue between minority and majority groups.

    See how it works
    PIER intervention

This intervention builds on the Welcome to School initiative developed by the Pharos Refugees and Health Knowledge Centre (the Netherlands), with support from the European Refugee Fund. Rooted in the theoretical principles of social capital, the Welcome to School Initiative seeks to strengthen the competencies of refugee and migrant youth with regards to self-esteem, coping, social skills and behavioral adjustment.

The initiative consists of 15 sessions that bring refugee and migrant adolescents of a class group together in small discussion groups under the guidance of their teacher. The units seek to build bridges between the past, the present and the future, and cover a range of themes, such as people of importance, friendships, being in love and dating, leisure time, discrimination and visions for the future.

 

Throughout the programme, adolescents are encouraged to share experiences, thoughts and difficulties, and to collectively identify ways of dealing with certain stressors or problems. Emphasizing non-verbal techniques, such as drawing and drama, the adolescents will discover mutual difficulties and identify opportunities to co-construct solutions and ways forward – fortifying the social support networks of these young newcomers.

 

We will draw on lessons learnt from this initiative across three European countries (Belgium, Norway and Denmark) to carefully revise and adapt the manuals and session plans.

  • In-service teacher training

    The aim of the INSETT intervention is to enhance teachers’ insight into how refugee /migration experiences may impact young people’s psychosocial well-being and school functioning upon resettlement in a new country (Brenner & Kia-Keating, 2016; Pastoor, 2015, 2017).

    See how it works
    In-service teacher training
  • Welcome To School

    This intervention builds on the Welcome to School initiative developed by the Pharos Refugees and Health Knowledge Centre (the Netherlands), with support from the European Refugee Fund. Rooted in the theoretical principles of social capital, the Welcome to School Initiative seeks to strengthen the competencies of refugee and migrant youth with regards to self-esteem, coping, social skills and behavioral adjustment.

    See how it works
    Welcome To School
  • Classroom Drama intervention

    In a nine-week drama workshop intervention program, refugee and migrant adolescents in multi-ethnic schools work around the construction of group stories that support the construction of identity and meaning, aiming to establish bridges between past and present and to engage with themes of migration, exclusion, pluriform identities and cultural adaptation in host societies.

    See how it works
    Classroom Drama intervention
  • Teaching Recovery Techniques + In-service Teacher Training

    Teaching Recovery Techniques is a manualized intervention developed by the Children and War foundation (Yule, Dyregrov, Raundalen, & Smith, 2013). TRT is based on trauma focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) and includes seven sessions for young people and two for the caregivers. For children, session one is about getting to know each other and session seven a follow-up.

    See how it works
    Teaching Recovery Techniques + In-service Teacher Training
  • PIER intervention

    The intervention ‘Enhancing Peer Interactions and Social Capital’ (EPISC) develops a participatory approach to supporting safe, positive peer interactions and social relationships in multi-ethnic schools. Through clustering pupils with migrant and non-migrant background in small collaborative groups working together on establishing social connection and participatory activities in the school context, the intervention aims at strengthening school belonging and promoting dialogue between minority and majority groups.

    See how it works
    PIER intervention

The aim of the INSETT intervention is to enhance teachers’ insight into how refugee /migration experiences may impact young people’s psychosocial well-being and school functioning upon resettlement in a new country (Brenner & Kia-Keating, 2016; Pastoor, 2015, 2017).

Lead partner: Norway

In-Service Teacher Training (INSETT) (responsible expert: NKVTS, Norway)

 

The intervention, which is being developed by Lutine de Wal Pastoor (NKVTS), intends to strengthen teachers’ competence and self-efficacy in three areas:

  • Promoting refugee/migrant students’ mental health and psychosocial wellbeing;
  • Encouraging positive interethnic relationships and strengthening school belonging;
  • Fostering supportive interrelationships with parents, caregivers and/or guardians to promote school involvement.

 

In other words, INSETT seeks to make teachers and schools (more) ‘refugee competent’ (Pastoor, 2015).

The INSETT intervention will run over a period of 10-12 weeks. It consists of three interrelated course modules, i.e., two collective learning modules (whole-day seminars) and – in between – an individual module (the Augeo online course).

 

As a thematic framework, INSETT will use the Dutch Augeo Foundation’s online teacher training course “Providing support to refugee young people”. This online course consists of 8 sections, ‘lectures’ that can be followed flexibly and separately (4-5 hours of study in total). Each lecture deals with a special theme, including theory, case histories, exercises and recommendations for further reading.

 

Certain themes of the online course will be elaborated upon in the two full-day seminars for the participating teachers. A joint introductory seminar starts off the INSETT intervention and explains its goals, content, design and methods as well as its implementation in relation to the particular national and institutional context. Furthermore, it will present central migration terms as well as how the refugee/migration experience may have an impact on students’ school functioning and wellbeing.

 

After having completed the Augeo online course, a final follow-up seminar will allow the participants to share their experiences as well as provide the opportunity to elaborate more on certain topics of interest. Relevant topics will be to learn more about trauma and stress, the therapeutic ‘window of tolerance’ (Ogden et al., 2006; Siegel, 1999), self-regulation and other coping techniques (Schultz, 2013).

 

Another central topic will be identity and belonging, especially the importance of developing a sense of school belonging which increases students’ well-being as well as the likeliness to succeed in school (Kia-Keating & Ellis, 2007).

  • In-service teacher training

    The aim of the INSETT intervention is to enhance teachers’ insight into how refugee /migration experiences may impact young people’s psychosocial well-being and school functioning upon resettlement in a new country (Brenner & Kia-Keating, 2016; Pastoor, 2015, 2017).

    See how it works
    In-service teacher training
  • Welcome To School

    This intervention builds on the Welcome to School initiative developed by the Pharos Refugees and Health Knowledge Centre (the Netherlands), with support from the European Refugee Fund. Rooted in the theoretical principles of social capital, the Welcome to School Initiative seeks to strengthen the competencies of refugee and migrant youth with regards to self-esteem, coping, social skills and behavioral adjustment.

    See how it works
    Welcome To School
  • Classroom Drama intervention

    In a nine-week drama workshop intervention program, refugee and migrant adolescents in multi-ethnic schools work around the construction of group stories that support the construction of identity and meaning, aiming to establish bridges between past and present and to engage with themes of migration, exclusion, pluriform identities and cultural adaptation in host societies.

    See how it works
    Classroom Drama intervention
  • Teaching Recovery Techniques + In-service Teacher Training

    Teaching Recovery Techniques is a manualized intervention developed by the Children and War foundation (Yule, Dyregrov, Raundalen, & Smith, 2013). TRT is based on trauma focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) and includes seven sessions for young people and two for the caregivers. For children, session one is about getting to know each other and session seven a follow-up.

    See how it works
    Teaching Recovery Techniques + In-service Teacher Training
  • PIER intervention

    The intervention ‘Enhancing Peer Interactions and Social Capital’ (EPISC) develops a participatory approach to supporting safe, positive peer interactions and social relationships in multi-ethnic schools. Through clustering pupils with migrant and non-migrant background in small collaborative groups working together on establishing social connection and participatory activities in the school context, the intervention aims at strengthening school belonging and promoting dialogue between minority and majority groups.

    See how it works
    PIER intervention